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FIU SERC's Dr. Rudolf Jaffé recently co-authored a study with University of Colorado Boulder, CU Boulder's National Snow and Ice Data Center, the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, and the Naval Research Laboratory in Monterey, California. The study compares dissolved black carbon deposition on ice and snow in ecosystems around the world and shows that while concentrations vary widely, significant amounts can persist in both pristine and non-pristine areas of snow.

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When a cold spell strikes the tropics, an animal's location at any given moment could be the difference between life and death. That was the case with a Florida Everglades fish called a common snook when a cold snap struck in 2010, scientists report today - World Oceans Day - in the journal Global Change Biology. This study involved FIU SERC researchers Mahadev Bhat, Rudolf Jaffe, Michael Sukop, Jennifer Rehage, Pallab Mozumder, and Ross Boucek.

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The Everglades is the largest wetland of its kind in North America, but it’s been under assault for generations by residential development, water diversion and pesticide runoff. Now, a massive proposal is one step closer to putting more fresh water back into the ecosystem that covers more than 2,000 square miles of south Florida. SERC researcher Dr. Tiffany Troxler discusses why this is important for the Everglades given sea level rise and saltwater intrusion.

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The Everglades ecosystem is vast, stretching more than 200 miles from Orlando to Florida Bay, and Everglades National Park is but a part located at the southern end. During the 19th and 20th centuries, the historical Everglades has been reduced to half of its original size, and what remains is not the pristine ecosystem many image it to be, but one that has been highly engineered and otherwise heavily influenced, and is intensely managed by humans.

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An entirely new community of life on the skin and shells of sea turtles was revealed to the world in 2015 when several new species of diatoms (a type of microscopic algae) unique to sea turtles were described. Scientists have been studying sea turtles for over a century, so it is amazing to think that a new and unique community was just under the noses and eyes of so many people and overlooked for so long. Read more from SERC researchers here.

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Many sea-level rise (SLR) assessments focus on populations presently inhabiting vulnerable coastal communities1, but no studies have yet attempted to model the destinations of these potentially displaced persons. With millions of potential future migrants in heavily populated coastal communities, SLR scholarship focusing solely on coastal communities characterizes SLR as primarily a coastal issue, obscuring the potential impacts in landlocked communities created by SLR-induced displacement.

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Massive seagrass beds in Western Australia’s Shark Bay have showed little recovery from a devastating 2011 heat wave, according to a new study. The team's findings demonstrate how certain vital ecosystems may change drastically in a warming climate. Read more here.

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FIU/USAID WA-WASH Regional Director Dr. Lakhdar Boukerrou recently attended a meeting with the members of the Burkina Faso Parliamentarians Network for Drinking Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene. This meeting follows the marketing workshop of the REPHA-BF 2016-2020 action plan held on March 31, 2017. The REPHA-BF gathers Parliamentarians from various political parties in Burkina Faso. The objective of this Network is to contribute to improving the quality of drinking water and sanitation services.

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The 4th meeting of the USAID/West Africa WASH Coordinating Secretariat was held from March 2 to 3, 2017 in Accra, Ghana. In addition to the members of the Coordinating Secretariat, representatives of some 20 organizations working in the WASH sector in Ghana attended this meeting. The meeting provided the participants with an opportunity to share views and information on the issues related to the improvement of communities’ access to water and sanitation services.

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Researchers are taking a step back to answer the question of whether long-term studies are helping save plants, animals and the places they call home. The global answer is yes. FIU researchers are gathering data in the Everglades that provide critical information needed for restoration and conservation. They’ve been doing this for more than a decade. Read more on their efforts here.

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